William H. Knapp III

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1. A well defined procedure that produces a single observation is known as what?
Outcome.
Outcome Space.
Probability Function.
Probability Space.
Statistical Experiment.

2. A single observation is known as what?
Outcome.
Outcome Space.
Probability Function.
Probability Space.
Statistical Experiment.

3. What assigns values to potential observations that describe how much we would expect to observe them in the long run?
Outcome.
Outcome Space.
Probability Function.
Probability Space.
Statistical Experiment.

4. The collection of all potential observations and the values describing how much we would expect to observe them in the long run is known as what?
Outcome.
Outcome Space.
Probability Function.
Probability Space.
Statistical Experiment.

5. Imagine I was giving people a survey in which they could identify as an extrovert or an introvert. What is my outcome space?
Extrovert.
Introvert.
Both Extrovert and Introvert.
Either Extrovert or Introvert.

6. Imagine I was giving people a survey in which they could identify as an extrovert or an introvert. What is an outcome? Pick the best answer.
Extrovert.
Introvert.
Both Extrovert and Introvert.
Either Extrovert or Introvert.

7. Why is the probability of a coin turning up heads on any flip .5? Pick the best answer.
Because heads is one of two events
Because heads is one of two equally probable events.
Because of the way we set up our statistical experiment.
Because someone has flipped a fair coin an infinite number of times and determined that .5 is the probability of observing a heads.

8. Theory can be used to generate a probability function.
True.
False.

9. Observing all the outcomes in a population can be used to generate a probability function.
True.
False.

10. Sampling from a population of interest can be used to generate a probability function.
True.
False.

11. If we're interested in learning about the average educational level of adult Turkish citizens, what are all of the adult Turkish citizens known as?
Outcome.
Population.
Sample.

12. If we're interested in learning about the average educational level of adult Turkish citizens, what would a group of 100 randomly picked Turkish citizens be known as?
Outcome.
Population.
Sample.

13. Let's say we go to an international conference at which there are 10 Africans, 15 Asians, 5 Australians, 8 North Americans, and 12 South Americans. What's the probability that a person drawn randomly from the conference atendees would be from Antartica?
0
.1
.16
.2
.24
.3
.5
1

14. Let's say we go to an international conference at which there are 10 Africans, 15 Asians, 5 Australians, 8 North Americans, and 12 South Americans. What's the probability that a person drawn randomly from the conference atendees would be from Africa?
0
.16
.2
.24
.4
1

15. In all outcome spaces, each unique outcome is equally likely.
True.
False.

16. What is the maximum probability that some outcome could have?
negative infinity
-100
-1
0
1
100
infinity

17. What is the minimum probability that some outcome could have?
negative infinity
-100
-1
0
1
100
infinity

18. What type of data typically appear in bar graphs?
Qualitative data (e.g. frequencies of members of different religions).
Qunatitative data (e.g. frequencies of observations in some range of continuously varying scores).
Both qualitative and quantitative data appear equally often.
Neither, some other type of data typically appears.

19. What type of data typically appear in histograms?
Qualitative data (e.g. frequencies of members of different religions).
Qunatitative data (e.g. frequencies of observations in some range of continuously varying scores).
Both qualitative and quantitative data appear equally often.
Neither, some other type of data typically appears.

20. What best describes the law of large numbers?
As our sample sizes grow, our estimates of population values and probabilities get better.
If you take a sample with a large number of observations (e.g. 10,000 observations), your estimates of populations will always be correct.
If you observe a large number of heads when flipping fair coins, you will observe more tails in the future.
All of the above are excellent descriptions of the law of large numbers.